Events

An evening of bowling with friends

27 Jun 2016, Posted by Seasons Hospice Foundation in Events

Seasons Hospice Foundation held a fundraiser event at Kings Rosemont on Thursday June 9th, 2016. An evening of bowling with friends, fun prizes, and great food, the Foundation was able to raise over $30,000. The funds will benefit hospice patients and their families through the special programs offered by Seasons Hospice Foundation. Extending beyond the borders of traditional healthcare, the Foundation treats the whole person and their loved ones in ways that touch the human spirit — adding days to life and life to days.

Donation from the Sacred Wave Gong Immersions

08 Apr 2015, Posted by Seasons Hospice Foundation in Donation, Events

Please note that Sacred Wave Gong Immersions will be donating 25% of their profits to Seasons Hospice Foundation in support of the Camp Kangaroo program beginning April 19th through May 17, 2015.

Follow us on MeetUp.com and Facebook.

RESERVATION REQURED VIA MEETUP.COM OR CHRISTOPER DAVIS (248)721.7094

Location

301 W. Fourth St.
Suite 490
Royal Oak MI 48067

View more information at www.sacredwavegongimmersions.com

 Sacred Wave Gong Immersions

SCHEDULE

Soft Landing Sunday

11am-12:30pm DONATION
1pm-2:30 suggested fee $25
3pm-4:30 suggested fee $25
5pm-6:30 suggested fee $25

Motivating Manifesting Monday

8am-9 suggested fee $15
7pm-8:40 suggested fee $25

Transformation Tuesday

7pm-8:45 suggested fee $25

Sacred Saturday

9am-10:30 suggested fee $25

 

Bridging the Gap in Advanced Illness

31 Jul 2014, Posted by Seasons Hospice Foundation in Events

Bridging the Gap in Advanced Illness: Pain Management, Ethics, and Communication

Join us for a healthcare conference at the Crowne Plaza Chicago O’Hare Hotel. The program is appropriate for all practice levels and is open to the public. Continuing Education Credits are available and luncheon is included with your registration fee.

Our October 8, 2014, conference in Rosemont, Illinois, features three presentations with specific learning objectives. Use these quick links to access conference information and descriptions of our program presentations. We hope you will join us. We look forward to your participation.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8th, 2014
CROWN PLAZA HOTEL
Chicago O’Hare
5440 N River Rd.
Rosemont, IL, 60018

(847) 671-6350.

To reserve a room using the special group rate, use the group code “Seasons Hospice”. Parking will be available at the hotel for a discounted fee of $13.00

Physicians: $225
Nurses, Social Workers, & other Health Professionals: $120
Students: $80

Lunch will be provided to participants.

Register Now

Dr. Balu Natarajan, MD.

Relieving Pain and Suffering in Advanced Illness & Disease Progression

Patients with advanced illness often experience pain in multiple dimensions of their lives. Palliative Care takes a holistic approach to the assessment and treatment of pain. Beginning with the fundamentals, Cicely Saunders’ concept of total pain will be explained. The latest evidence and innovations in pain management and relief of suffering will be provided and illustrated through case discussions.

Learning Objectives
  1. Define the concept of total pain in palliative care.
  2. Describe assessment methods for the 4 dimensions of total pain.
  3. Discuss intervention strategies for non-physical pain.
  4. Explain pharmacological treatments for acute pain, persistent physical pain and breakthrough pain during illness progression.

Dr. Russell Hilliard, PhD, LCSW, LCAT, MT-BC, CHRC

Provider Support and Distress: Ethical Dilemmas

The ethics of care requires a delicate balance between the conventional practice of medicine and the wishes of the patient. While planning a patient’s care, not only should treatment options and likely outcomes be considered, but also the patient’s values, hopes, and beliefs. It is really dependent upon healthcare providers to inform patients and families of all treatment options to help them make an informed decision. This course discusses some of the ethical dilemmas that are faced by today’s healthcare provider while helping patients and families make an informed decision.

Learning Objectives
  1. Identify the 4 basic ethical principles.
  2. Identify when withholding or withdrawing treatment is ethically sound.
  3. Define “moral distress.”
  4. Articulate the 4 A’s approach in reducing and addressing moral distress.
  5. Recognize ways to resolve conflict within the plan of care.
  6. Identify ways to navigate conflict

Dr. Joshua Hauser, MD

Challenging Conversations: Assessing a Patient/Family’s Goals for Care

For many hospitalized patients facing a health crisis, considering treatment goals and health care preferences can be overwhelming.
Patients and families are often confused by the choices in front of them. Health care professionals are challenged to help patients
navigate through these difficult choices while respecting their right to self-determination. Through interactive case discussions, participants will learn the fundamental components of successful family meetings and to support patients and families through this decision making process.

Learning Objectives
  1. Explain the ethical and legal context of care planning in hospitalized patients with advanced illness.
  2. Describe the Respecting Choices Model of Patient Centered Family Decision Making.
  3. Discuss how to prepare and conduct a successful family meeting.
  4. Explain how to follow through on the decisions made.

Time

Program

7:30 AM – 8 AM Registration
8:00 AM – 8:15 AM Welcome & Introductions
8:15 AM – 10:15 AM Calling the Marines: Cutting Edge Pharmacotherapeutic Pain Management at the End
10:15 AM – 10:30 AM Break
10:30 AM – 12:30 AM Provider Support and Distress: Ethical Dilemmas
12:30 AM – 1:30 AM Lunch
1:30 AM – 3:30 AM Ice to Eskimos: Making the Case for Hospice Care to a Death Averse Society
3:30 AM – 3:45 AM Closing/Evaluations

Continuing Education: 6 CEUs Continuing Education Credits (CEUs/Clock Hours/Contact Hours/CMEs) will be awarded to Physicians, Nurses, and Social Workers who attend the entire presentation and complete an evaluation of the Bridging the Gap in Advanced Illness program. The program is geared toward the health care community, is open to the public, and is appropriate for all practice levels (applications pending approval).

Community Open House
Celebration of Legacies – July 8 in Des Plaines

07 Jul 2014, Posted by Seasons Hospice Foundation in Events

Seasons Hospice Foundation will host a community open house- Celebration of Legacies on July 8, 2014 in Des Plaines. Attendees will learn the importance of leaving behind a legacy for their family and friends, creating a bucket list, and how an online social network can deliver future messages to their loved ones even after their gone. Seasons Hospice Foundation and their partners, BeRemembered and CareFlash want to celebrate life and honor its end by offering people tools for “social healing” through the use of social networking sites.

Download Press Release

Hospice Inpatient Center Opening in Boston, MA

24 Jun 2014, Posted by Seasons Hospice Foundation in Events

SHF-boston-group_photo

SHF-boston-group2

Seasons Hospice & Palliative Care is very excited to bring a Hospice Inpatient Center to Boston! A Hospice Inpatient Center provides a caring environment where patients can get help for their symptoms. It is a place where loved ones may spend hours or days with the patient, providing the warmth and comfort that family and friends can offer. Hospice care is normally delivered in the home but there are cases that require a higher level of clinical care. This level of care is designed for a short stay so the hospice patient can be transitioned home or cared for in a different setting.

Groundbreaking: May 15, 2014
Construction beings: May 16, 2014
Estimated project completion: End of 1st quarter, 2015

CONTACT US WITH ANY ADDITIONAL QUESTIONS.
Seasons Hospice & Palliative Care of Massachusetts, LLC

(T): 866-670-9449
(E): info@seasons.org

Seasons Hospice Foundation

(T): 847-692-1000
(E): foundation@seasonsfoundation.org

WHAT IS HOSPICE?

Hospice care is a philosophy of caring that assists those nearing the end of life and in need of refuge. It is a system of caring designed to restore dignity and provide a sense of personal fulfillment to the dying. The focus is on the patient and the family rather than the disease; the goal is to improve the quality of life that remains. For more information, visit www.seasons.org.

WHAT IS A HOSPICE INPATIENT CENTER?

Hospice is typically provided in the comfort of home during the end of life. When a patient’s pain cannot be adequately managed in a homecare setting they have the option of being referred into an inpatient center. A hospice inpatient center provides a uniquely serene, comfortable, and medically supported atmosphere where loved ones can be together.

For more information, visit http://www.seasons.org/page/Inpatient%2BCare.

HISTORY

The land that the new hospice inpatient center is being built on was the former site of the Saint Elizabeth Rectory which was built in the 1800s. In 1830, Joseph Howe, famous politician and leader of the Liberal Party, bought the land and built the “Howe House” . His son, Sam, founded the Perkins School for the Blind and his daughter, Julia, wrote the “Battle Hymn of the Republic”. While the building is no longer on site, we appreciate the historic significance of it and have tried to capture the essence of the community and the history. The new center is designed with a residential feeling with the traditional New England style structure.

FACILITY OVERVIEW

A Special Use Permit from the town of Milton was approved on June 5, 2013. Seasons Hospice Foundation purchased the property from the Archdiocese of Boston and will lease it to Seasons Hospice & Palliative Care so they can provide licensed hospice and palliative care to those in need. There is no facility in the Boston area exclusively providing this kind of hospice care.

It is a one-story, residentially styled building containing approximately 10,000-12,500 square feet and sits on 1.422 acres of land. There are 15 private rooms for patients in addition to family rooms, common areas, a full-service kitchen, nurse’s station, and office areas for the hospice operator. Lush landscaping provides a serene setting and enhances curb appeal. The Facility has been pre-approved by the Massachusetts Dept. of Public Health and has 10 times the space of required parking. The lighting is in conformance with Milton code.

HOW DOES THIS BUILDING SERVE THE COMMUNITY?

Seasons Hospice & Palliative Care of Massachusetts, LLC currently provides care to patients at home, in hospitals, in assisted living residences, and in nursing homes. There is a great need for an inpatient hospice center in the Boston area for patients who require individualized treatment for pain and symptom management who cannot be cared for at home. Patients and their families prefer the comfortable setting of an inpatient center to the institutional setting of a hospital or a nursing home.

ARE THERE ANY NAMING OPPORTUNITIES?

As a non-profit, we do raise funds and naming opportunities are a great way to honor or memorialize a loved one. See our naming opportunities tab for a full list.

If you would like more information, please visit http://seasonsfoundation.org/contact-shf/

HOW CAN I GET INVOLVED?

For volunteer opportunities, please visit our website for more information: http://www.seasons.org/page/Volunteering

WHO IS SEASONS HOSPICE FOUNDATION AND SEASONS HOSPICE & PALLIATIVE CARE?

Seasons Hospice Foundation’s vision is to help people celebrate life and honor its end. The dedicated teams at Seasons Hospice Foundation work collaboratively with Seasons Hospice & Palliative Care clinical teams to carry out patients’ wishes, creating lasting memories for patients and their loved ones. Seasons Hospice Foundation offers non-hospice related supportive services, not related to the patient’s hospice diagnosis and that fall outside of what is paid for by the traditional hospice benefit. The Foundation provides meaningful and thoughtful ways to advance the communities awareness to the benefits of hospice and palliative care through its special programs, community education, and applied research. Seasons Hospice Foundation is a 501 (c)3 non-profit organization.

 

Seasons Hospice & Palliative Care was founded in 1997 and operates 20 Medicare-certified clinical operations. It is the 4th largest hospice provider in the United States and admitted over 17,000 patients in 2013. It operates 10 Inpatient Hospice Centers nationally. The company provided $3.2 million of charity care in 2013. Seasons Hospice & Palliative Care utilizes the highest levels of technology available in the hospice industry including many proprietary systems. The company provides an in-house 24/7 call center staffed with registered nurses. They provide industry leading clinical programs that include Music Therapy, Pediatrics, Open Access and more.

 

The mission of these two organizations are extremely complementary and, therefore, the Foundation will own the building and lease to Seasons Hospice & Palliative Care which will be licensed to provide hospice services at the facility. The Foundation views the ownership of this proposed building as a wonderful opportunity to further advance its charitable mission. The benefit for the community, patients, and their families will extend far beyond the traditional Medicare benefit.

Naming Opportunity

Amount

Inpatient Center $750,000
End of Life Resource Center (future construction) $500,000
Sunrooom (future construction) $250,000
Lobby $100,000
Family Room $50,000
Dining Room $50,000
Kid’s Lounge $25,000
Consult Room $25,000
Patient Rooms (15) $25,000
Interactive Display $25,000
Platinum (multiple) $1,000
Gold (multiple) $500
Copper (multiple) $250
Garden $15,000
Kitchen $10,000
Staff Support Lounge $10,000
Staff Office $5,000
Unit Director Office $5,000
Nurse’s Station $5,000
Legacy Project Support (multiple) $5,000
Children’s Bereavement Library (multiple) $5,000

Camp Kangaroo

04 Jun 2014, Posted by Seasons Hospice Foundation in Events

Calling All Campers!

Camp season is our favorite season, no matter what time of year it is! As Seasons professionals and volunteers, we enjoy nothing more than our camp experiences with kids who have lost a parent or other significant loved one.

The Foundation has plans to host Camp Kangaroo for kids age 5-13 all across the country, at the following locations:

  • Naperville, IL (Aug. 1-3)
  • Baltimore, MD (Oct 3-5)
  • Mukwonago, WI (Oct 17 -19)
  • San Diego, CA (Nov 22-24)
  • Ferndale, MI (Dec 19 -21)
  • Miami, FL (Jan 16-29, 2015)
  • Boston, MA (June 6-7, 2015)
  • San Antonio, TX (Oct 10-12, 2015)

 

 

Register for Camp

Why Camp Kangaroo?

Here, children can journey through grief—and embrace life—in a safe and supportive atmosphere. With dedicated bereavement professionals and volunteers on hand, children learn what grief is and experience healthy outlets for expressing their feelings. The camp staff provides education, dispelling myths and misunderstanding children often have about death. Campers are provided peer support by connections with others in their age group on the same journey. Through their camp experiences, children can honor their lost loved one and begin to move forward through their grief. Most importantly, Camp Kangaroo is a source of fun for the kids most in need of it.

Camp Kangaroo is offered free of charge to qualifying children, through the generous gifts of Seasons Hospice Foundation donors.

Keep posted for announcements of camp dates coming soon!

Kids + Camping=Connection

campKangaroo2012

Upcoming Camp Kangaroo Events

Bridging the Gap in Advanced Illness

25 Apr 2014, Posted by Seasons Hospice Foundation in Events

Bridging the Gap in Advanced Illness:
Pain Management, Ethics, and Communication

DATE & LOCATION: TBA

Physicians: $225
Nurses, Social Workers, & other Health Professionals: $120
Students: $80

 

 

Register Now

Dr. Mary Lynn McPherson, Pharm. D., BCPS, CPE

Calling the Marines: Cutting Edge Pharmacotherapeutic Pain Management at the End

Patients with advanced illness often experience pain that is not optimally controlled with customary interventions. This presentation will provide participants with an overview of “red flags” that indicate therapeutic failure in pain management, situations requiring opioid rotation, opioidinduced neurotoxicity, methadone dosing, managing breakthrough pain
and the use of adjunctive analgesics such as ketamine and lidocaine. Using a case-based active learning teaching style, participants will leave this presentation with strategies they can implement immediately on return to their practice, which are best deployed through team-based care.

 

Learning Objectives
  1. Assess a patient with advanced illness for actual or potential pain, and identify at least three indicators of poorly controlled pain including opioid-induced neurotoxicity.
  2. Given an actual or simulated patient with poorly controlled pain, recommend dosing strategies for rotation to methadone, addition of ketamine or lidocaine.
  3. Given a case of a patient with advanced illness, recommend dosing strategies for the management of breakthrough pain including idiopathic pain, volitional pain and end-of-dose deterioration.

Dr. Russell Hilliard, PhD, LCSW, LCAT, MT-BC, CHRC

Provider Support and Distress: Ethical Dilemmas

The ethics of care requires a delicate balance between the conventional practice of medicine and the wishes of the patient. While planning a patient’s care not only should treatment options and likely outcomes be considered, but also patient values, hopes and beliefs. It is really dependent upon healthcare providers to inform patients and families of all treatment options to help them make an informed decision. Thiscourse discusses some of the ethical dilemmas that are faced by today’s healthcare provider while helping patients and families make an informed decision.

 

Learning Objectives
  1. Identify the 4 basic ethical principles.
  2. Identify when withholding or withdrawing treatment is ethically sound.
  3. Define “moral distress.”
  4. Articulate the 4 A’s approach in reducing and addressing moral distress.
  5. Recognize ways to resolve conflict within the plan of care.
  6. Identify ways to navigate conflict

Dr. Stephen A. Leedy, MD FAAHPM

Ice to Eskimos: Making the Case for Hospice Care to a Death Averse Society

If you think selling ice to Eskimos is hard, try selling hospice in 21st century America! Kubler-Ross described us as a “death-denying society” and Freud noted that “each of us, in the unconscious, is convinced of their immortality.” Strategies for successfully engaging such a death-averse populace in discussions about advanced illness and hospice care will be described. Specific tools targeting referring physicians will be demonstrated.

 

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the challenges in making the case for hospice to a death-averse audience and identify strategies for overcoming these.
  2. Describe the value of a professional sales force in increasing access to hospice services.
  3. Detail several novel approaches to community and physician engagement.

 

Time

Program

7:30 AM – 8 AM Registration
8:00 AM – 8:15 AM Welcome & Introductions
8:15 AM – 10:15 AM Calling the Marines: Cutting Edge
Pharmacotherapeutic Pain Management
at the End
10:15 AM – 10:30 AM Break
10:30 AM – 12:30 AM Provider Support and Distress: Ethical Dilemmas
12:30 AM – 1:30 AM Lunch
1:30 AM – 3:30 AM Ice to Eskimos: Making the Case for Hospice Care to a Death Averse Society
3:30 AM – 3:45 AM Closing/Evaluations
TBA
Continuing Education: 6 CEUs
Continuing Education Credits (CEUs/Clock Hours/Contact Hours/CMEs) will be awarded to Physicians, Nurses, and Social Workers who attend the entire presentation and complete an evaluation of the Bridging the Gap in Advanced Illness program. The program is geared toward the health care community, is open to the public, and is appropriate for all practice levels (applications pending approval).

SHF Board Meetings

13 Feb 2014, Posted by Seasons Hospice Foundation in Events

See the dates below to find out when our next SHF boarding meeting will take place.

MARCH

MAY

AUGUST

DECEMBER

TBD  TBD TBD TBD